CHANGES IN THE SPANISH MIGRATION LAW THAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

CHANGES IN THE SPANISH MIGRATION LAW THAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Have you ever heard of Costa Brava? If you usually do tourism in Spain, possibly yes. Being the coastal area that covers the entire stretch from Blanes to PortBou, border with France, it is one of the most visited destinations for its delicious climate and fabulous maritime environment.

Until recently, its immeasurable growth was welcomed with open arms by locals and local business owners. However, in recent months, the opposite has happened. Bars, hotels and other establishments have had to reduce their operations.

The reason? Far from facing a problem of low tourism, they face the opposite: a terrible lack of workers. This scenario, as well as many others throughout the country, has driven government policies aimed at repopulation.

READ MORE: READY-MADE FUNDS: QUESTIONS FOR MARK SIMENSTAD, VICE PRESIDENT OF FIXED INCOME INVESTMENTS

And no, we are not only talking about these “programs” where they seek to mobilize the population to the periphery in exchange for benefits. We are talking about real changes in immigration policies, which encourage a young and capable workforce to move to that country.

 

WHERE DO THE CHANGES START?

Let’s look at the statistics. According to official sources, approximately five million foreigners live in Spain. Most of them, from Latin America and with an irregular migratory situation or, at least, unfavorable. Let’s remember that this is an official number, which may well be insufficient compared to the real number.

Most of these immigrants find themselves in vicious legal circles xnxx, which do not allow them to establish themselves legally to start enjoying the benefits that the country could offer them as citizens. That is where the new Immigration Law Reform comes in.

Its main objective is the due process of those who are in an irregular situation, providing an opportunity to obtain residence and work permits, hoping to fill the vacancies with the greatest demand in the country.

MAIN CASES OF APPLICATION

MAIN CASES OF APPLICATION

STUDENTS

One of the main foreign groups that will benefit will be foreign students enrolled in Spanish education centers.
One of the main problems so far with the Spanish student visa was the work limitation. While they were studying, they could not work legally to pay for them. This situation gave rise to underhanded hiring, often under unfavorable conditions for the worker.

READ MORE: FAIR TREATMENT FOR UNDOCUMENTED STUDENTS

The new reform, among other things, will give them access to legal work for 30 hours a week. Likewise, once the studies are completed, the student may stay up to one more year without requesting an extension of their visa. Even, under certain specific criteria, said student may access a work authorization. This legal figure is specially designed for profiles with high demand and low supply in the country.

ROOTED THROUGH TRAINING

Another of the cases contemplated in the reform is access to a temporary residence of up to 12 months if the foreigner acquires a commitment with the state to train in a high-demand labor area.

This modality is incorporated into the list of roots that were already contemplated in the Immigration Law:

  • Social roots.
  • Labor roots.

HIRING AT ORIGIN

The function of the reform in this space is to make existing conditions more flexible, both for temporary and regular workers.

Let us remember that, until recently, it was possible to access a temporary residence after hiring a Spanish company or organization in your country of origin. The idea is to provide the best and most demanded profiles with benefits that allow them to access temporary or permanent residence more quickly and efficiently.

FAMILY REUNION

As a last key point, the reform supposes an improvement in the general conditions to achieve a family reunification of foreign units in Spain.

READ MORE: HOW TO WORK EFFECTIVELY TO STOP MASS IMMIGRATION

One of the key elements is the immediate obtaining of work and residence permits at the time of entering the Spanish dream. Likewise, considerable flexibility is observed when the cases involve minors, people with disabilities or in any situation of vulnerability.

And you, what do you think of these measures? Do you consider that they can be seen as an improvement for the life of foreigners in Spain?

 

NEWS VIDEO

 

The issue of separated families of US legal residents: a proposed legislation

When a Legal Permanent Resident of the US marries a person residing outside the US it takes approximately four years before they can live in the US as a family! This is due to our current Immigration laws that has separated families rather than unify them. This coupled with the fact that millions of ‘undocumented aliens’ that were accorded legal status under the 1986 amnesty program has overwhelmed the current quota system by sponsoring their immediate relatives since the 90s. The current backlog stands at approximately 1.05 million spouses and minor children of Legal Permanent Residents of the US. Of this approximately 70% are ‘beneficiaries of legalized aliens’. The obvious question is what happens to them aliens that were legal to begin with, them that played by the rules? Simple: they got screwed!! All for being law abiding!

Current waiting times are four years and increasing and its our aim through APSR to renew efforts to have Congress pass legislation to allow visiting rights to separated spouses and minor children which is tearing our families apart! Currently spouses and minor children of Legal Permanent Residents are refused visiting visas for the fear they may never return to their home country after the visit since one of the spouses is resident in the US.

Legislative Background

A major immigration bill IMMACT90 passed in 1990 was aimed at overhauling the nations immigration laws. It did not improve the situation for legal permanent residents in their efforts to unify their family. Since then Congress has dealt with unification of spouses of Permanent Residents on three separate occasions. Each time after having introduced appropriate legislation it failed to turn into law despite bipartisan support.

Following are the details of the bills introduced:
HR 4275 and S 2385 in the 102nd Congress and HR 3182 and S 618 in the 103rd Congress. Most recently the JORDAN COMMISSION (1995) which convened to recommend appropriate legislation overwhelmingly supported family unification issues for legal permanent residents of the US. PSR testified both before Congress and the JORDAN COMMISSION. However to-date nothing has happened to resolve the issue.

It is however no mean task to convince Congress and keep them aware of our suffering. It is our personal opinion that Congress may ultimately be ripe to pass appropriate legislation to address this issue in the 105th Congress. Please support APSR in its lobbying efforts and write your Congressman.

You do not have to be a member of APSR to feel the pain of separation. This is a humanitarian issue!

We would like to introduce legislation in Congress to address the following issues affecting separated families of US LEGAL RESIDENTS:

1) Legislation to create visiting visas for spouse and minor children of US LEGAL PERMANENT RESIDENTS that are waiting for permanent visas to become available. Incorporate ‘DUAL INTENT’ provision into law to alleviate suffering of separated families. NO ALTERATION OF CURRENT QUOTA SYSTEM IS RECOMMENDED AT THIS TIME. The proposed legislation is not aimed at reforming the current LEGAL IMMIGRATION system.

2) Such visas are to be given for a period of 90 days minimum renewable upto 180 days with all restrictions of the ‘entitlement bar’ applicable as outlined in the IIRRA ACT OF 1996. It must be made clear to Congress at this time that the intent of this legislation is purely humanitarian not to beat the system!

Congress has already seen legislation introduced to address this issue specifically in the 102nd and 103rd Congress.

3) Currently there are 1.05 million spouse and minor children waiting to join their families permanently in the US. This is a direct result of the Legalization of Beneficiaries program. Address this issue through appropriate legislation. LEGAL RESIDENTS that have abided by the law at all times cannot be equated with those that have attained Legal Status through the amnesty program.

4) Implement recommendations of the JORDAN COMMISSION report of 1995 to unify separated families of LEGAL PERMANENT RESIDENTS with immediate effect. Congress cannot continue to ignore this issue and espouse the cause of HUMAN RIGHTS and FAMILY VALUES throughout the world! The right of families is to be together not separated by inhuman laws such as enacted by Congress.